Katie Reid

Q&A with Abdulrazak Gurnah about latest novel ‘Afterlives’: “These stories have been with me all along…”

By AiW Guest: Judyannet Muchiri.
[…]
Judyannet Muchiri: This is a heavy story and yet there are moments of stillness, joy, love, and tenderness, if you will. I wonder how it is for you as a writer to capture this human existence in its totality as you have done in Afterlives. 

Abdulrazak Gurnah: My interest was not to write about the war or the ugliness of colonialism. Instead I want to make sure the context in which war and colonialism happened is understood. And that the people in that context were people with entire existences. I want to show how people who are wounded by the war and by life itself cope in these circumstances. Using the unexpected kindnesses in the story, I wanted to show that there is potential for kindness in people and sometimes circumstances can draw such kindness from us. 

“Such noise and screams and blood”: A Review of Abdulrazak Gurnah’s ‘Afterlives’ (2020)

By AiW Guest: Judyannet Muchiri.

In the wake of a bad dream, one of the protagonists in Abdulrazak Gurnah’s Afterlives, Hamza, laments: “such noise and screams and blood”. These words keep resounding when one thinks about the disruption caused by colonialism in Africa – how our grandparents and ancestors must have felt with the arrival of those who set themselves up as colonial masters.

Q&A: Words on the Times – Tinashe Mushakavanhu

Ahead of Jacana Media’s launch of “They Called You Dambudzo: A Memoir” by Flora Veit-Wild, we are fully pleased to be able to share Mushakavanhu’s Words on the Times – an AiW Q&A series initiated as the early stages of the pandemic set in to connect us and our changing experiences of work and working. 

Not only has Tinashe researched and written on Marechera extensively, and in a number of generative and connective ways and contexts, we are also delighted to be able to introduce Tinashe as a collaborator with us and member of our team here at AiW with these, his Words…